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Developer seeks to introduce fuel to A1 roadside services site
16 August, 2019
the current site

Plans for redevelopment of roadside services on the southbound A1 between Grantham and Stamford have been submitted to South Kesteven District Council.

The scheme would provide a new petrol filling station (PFS) with a convenience store and an option for a franchise within in it such as Greggs or Costa. The PFS would have parking for 12 cars and four bays for electric charging points.

There would also be facilities for refuelling HGVs and 14 HGV parking bays and spaces to park two coaches or caravans. The plan also provides for a building accommodating drive-thru units on the ground floor with two floors of hotel space above, and additional parking for more than 100 cars.

The site at Colsterworth currently comprises a public house/restaurant called the Fox, a diner, a vacant coach depot and parking. Opposite, on the northbound carriageway, is a Starbucks restaurant and Travelodge hotel.

The applicant for the scheme is The Fox Roadside Services, a company formed in February this year with one director, Paul Jeremy Adler.

A planning statement/design and access statement with the application, prepared by Pegasus Group, states: “The redevelopment of the existing roadside services with improved facilities will introduce refuelling and will enhance the choice and offer for road users along the A1, meeting modern demands with modern standards of provision.

“It will provide significant employment during both the construction and operational phases. It will improve the visual impact of the site on the surrounding area, and provides the opportunity to enhance biodiversity.

“The proposed development meets the government’s aspirations for on-line roadside services, and as a result will not be a destination in its own right.”


When a major car manufacturer like Ford predicts that sales of its electrified cars will outnumber petrol and diesel models by 2022, does that ring alarm bells about the possible speed of change for forecourts?